Lindsay Perigo
Lindsay Perigo

The Politically Incorrect Show - 14/02/2000

[Music - Die Fledermaus]

Good afternoon, Kaya Oraaa & welcome to the Politically Incorrect Show on the free speech network, Radio Pacific, for Monday February 14, proudly sponsored by Neanderton Nicotine Ltd, the show that says bugger the politicians & bureaucrats & all the other bossyboot busybodies who try to run our lives with our money; that stands tall for free enterprise, achievement, profit, & excellence, against the state-worshippers in our midst; that stands above all for the most sacred thing in the universe, the liberty of the human individual.

[Music up, music down!]

Oooo!! Today is an especially Politically Incorrect day, Valentine's Day, when your fancy may unashamedly turn to romance. The Human Wrongs Commissariat won't try to have you arrested & even the Ministry of Ugly Wimmin's Affairs will acknowledge the last word of its title.

Ironically, this day on which metaphorical wolves may be let loose owes its origin to attempts in Roman times to keep literal ones at bay. Fierce wolves prowled in the woods around Rome & it was the lot of the god Lupercus to fend them off. Every year on February 15 a holiday festival would be held in Lupercus' honour. On the eve of the celebrations the names of young Roman girls were written on slips of paper & placed into jars. Each young man then drew a slip, & whoever's name was on it was to be his sweetheart for the year.

The holiday later became called Valentine's Day after a priest of that name. The Emperor at the time, Claudius II had forbidden his soldiers to marry. He believed that marriage would distract them from the task at hand & make them less inclined to fight wars on his behalf. The priest Valentine, so it is claimed, married the soldiers in secret, in defiance of the Emperor's decree. Unfortunately he was found out & beheaded, on the eve, coincidentally of a festival in honour of Lupercus. When Rome became more Christian, the holiday was moved to the 14th in honour of Valentine & named after him. He was also declared a saint - one of the few, I would think, to be so honoured for services to the pleasures of the flesh & the heart rather than the mortification thereof that became the church's specialty.

On this St Valentine's Day we here at Pacific are reading out some of your own descriptions & recollections of close encounters of the intimate kind. Knowing that music is indeed the "food of love," I'm going to honour the occasion with an extract, "Happiness" from the operetta whose strains open my programme every day, Die Fledermaus. I especially enjoy the lyrics,

"May the way you choose to live
Bring you all the best that life can give
Like the gift of love
And the lift of love."

I hope it quickens your heart & transports your thoughts to the loves of your lives & the happiness they bring you. Even if unrequited, let there be pleasure in their contemplation. Happy Valentine's!

[Excerpt from Die Fledermaus]

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